Who is Jesus

It may seem strange, since the name seems to be known by almost everyone, but given the various religions and cults out there, “Who is Jesus?” is one of the most contested questions; it is also one of the most important questions that a person can ask. First of all, we must realize that since Jesus is central to the New Testament Scriptures by direct reference, and to the Hebrew Scriptures in terms of his Messiahship (although this Messiahship is contested by Rabbinical Judaism), this is not strictly a secular historical question. It must be noted that I say “secular historical question” slightly tongue-in-cheek, since I believe all history to be grounded in God. But we do acknowledge that there is biblical history recorded in the Scriptures as well as history that is not directly recorded in the Scriptures. Therefore, any attempt to answer who Jesus is cannot be confined to merely extra-Biblical historical sources, and here we will examine a passage of Scripture to answer our question of who Jesus is.

The foundational thing we must know is that Jesus is not merely human, but also deity, or God, the Eternal God. To believe that God is not eternal would be difficult to maintain under any doctrinal conception of God held by the monotheistic religions. Moreover, if God were not eternal, He could not be the first cause of all things or the creator, since something would have preceded His existence; so, it is logical that God would be eternal if He was indeed the creator. You can see how the eternal nature of Messiah contained in Micah 5:2 thus points to Jesus being deity:

 

Phrase  in Hebrew

Translation in English

וְאַתָּ֞ה בֵּֽית־לֶ֣חֶם אֶפְרָ֗תָה צָעִיר֙ לִֽהְיוֹת֙ בְּאַלְפֵ֣י יְהוּדָ֔ה מִמְּךָ֙ לִ֣י יֵצֵ֔א לִֽהְי֥וֹת מוֹשֵׁ֖ל בְּיִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וּמוֹצָאֹתָ֥יו מִקֶּ֖דֶם מִימֵ֥י עוֹלָֽם׃” 

Micah 5:1, BHS/WIVU

““But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old, From everlasting.”” (Micah 5:2, NKJV)

 

I have taken the liberty of including Micah 5:2, or rather, Micah 5:1 in the Masoretic text in both Hebrew and English. It states that Messiah’s goings forth were “from everlasting.” I will not take the time here to demonstrate that the Hebrew word עוֹלָֽם carries the connotation of eternal-ness. For that you can go to the website and see a message that deals with this very topic. While there are many ways to demonstrate that the Scriptures clearly teach that Jesus is God, Micah 5:2 succinctly points out this truth. Let us look at the argument more clearly:

•      God is eternal, and this is an essential characteristic of His nature;

•      Messiah is Eternal;

•      It follows that Messiah is God.

Groups such as the Black Hebrew Israelite Movement (I have written in more detail on this cult in other blog posts) may have some division on this issue, but the Scriptures certainly do not. Modern Rabbinical Judaism also denies the deity of Messiah, but it must be noted that the Judaism of the Second Temple Era would have had far less trouble with this concept. There are clearly verses pointing to Messiah having a nature that is not merely human, and acknowledgments of verses which point to His deity. Likewise, Islam denies the deity of Messiah quite clearly: “And say: (All) praise is due to Allah, Who has not taken a son and Who has not a partner in the kingdom, and Who has not a helper to save Him from disgrace; and proclaim His greatness magnifying (Him).”[1]

Any depiction of Jesus which does not take into account His deity paints a false view of Jesus, and thus falls short of the truth. This fact provides a strike against the Black Hebrew Israelites. Additionally, it shows that Islam, while it honors Him, denies the truth of Jesus. Finally, this truth highlights the failure of Rabbinical Judaism to acknowledge the Messiah for which it waits.

 

[1] M. H. Shakir, ed., The Quran (Medford, MA: Perseus Digital Library, n.d.). Surah 17:111.